TRAINING TUESDAY PODCAST 223 (MISSION MOMENT; CONFIDENCE; URGENCY; INITIATIVE)

Welcome to Tuesday Training Podcast…a conversation and collaboration between Army National Guard Recruiters where we can create a culture of excellence, collaborate creativity, and celebrate success.

This week, because of your efforts, lives will be changed, legacies will be started and generations will be impacted.  What you do matters…..you make a difference.

HOW MANY PEOPLE DID YOU ASK TO JOIN THE NATIONAL GUARD LAST WEEK?

3 Segments this week:

 

  • Mission Moment
  • 79T Tune Up
  • Leadership Lesson

 

 

MISSION MOMENT with CSM (r) Dave Eustice of Military Recruiting Experts

79T Tune-Up  

NGPAM 601-1

Chapter 2 Recruiting Activities

Section I Product Knowledge

Section II Time Management

Section III Public Speaking

Section IV Market Analysis

Section V Pre-Qualification

Section VI Telephone Prospecting

Section VII Sales Psychology

2-47. General

The ARNG recruiting doctrine relies mainly on accepted sales techniques for recruiting the force. The major tasks and functions of ARNG RRNCOs are similar to those of many civilian sales personnel. This section discusses the psychology of the sale. Psychology is the attitudes and behavior typical of a person or group. When it comes to selling –persuading people to enlist in the ARNG, memorizing a particular sales method or simply flying by the seat of your pants will result in lost enlistments. Understanding why an applicant responds differently to varying stimuli, and using a style and technique appropriate to the situation, will result in a higher enlistment-to-interview ratio.

2-48. Purpose

Having a specific system, this can be continuously modified in response to certain recognized attitudes and behaviors (in the middle of the interview) will enable the RRNCO to control the direction and outcome of the interview. With no two prospects being exactly alike, it is essential that the RRNCO be able to utilize the following techniques in a manner appropriate to the applicant.

  1. Winning attitude.
  2. Controlling techniques.
  3. Another element of the interview the RRNCO must control is the environment in which the interview is conducted.
  4. Selling you.
  5. Active listening.
  6. Usage of key words.
  7. Visualization. Sitting in the driver’s seat of an M-1 Abrahams tank or a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter is enough to get anyone’s blood pumping. You can create that picture in your prospect’s mind and the results will be amazing. A picture is worth a thousand words. Even single words trigger pictures in people’s minds. If you close your eyes and someone says Thanksgiving, what is the first thing that you see? Right! A big roasted turkey. That picture actually pops into your head. Selling an intangible product can be a challenge, but helping a prospect see himself/herself in uniform, riding in that new cherry red sports car (paid for by that monthly paycheck) or walking across the stage receiving that college diploma is a technique that will help you close the sale. There are thousands of pictures you can create to help the intangible become more real. Using this technique will allow a prospect to experience the benefits of ARNG membership even before they are enlisted.
  8. Techniques to build self esteem and confidence. Many prospects decide not to join the ARNG, or anything else, because they do not feel they have what it takes to be successful. They have self esteem problems and a serious lack of confidence. Many carry negative baggage around with them their entire life. It may be the product of past experience, possibly from their childhood and through the years of their upbringing. Problem? Not necessarily, this can be a fantastic opportunity for the RRNCO. You can end up with a highly disciplined, technically trained and self assured Soldier in the ARNG. You can actually see a prospect sit up straighter and start acting more self-assured when you explain to him what he can accomplish and become through membership in the ARNG. See “Usage of Key Words” and “Visualization” earlier in this section for ideas and language to use in accomplishing this task.
  9. Creating the urgency to act. Even an applicant, who sees all the advantages of ARNG membership and is planning to enlist, may feel no need to move forward in a timely fashion if you do not create a sense of urgency.  Many things can happen in an extended period of time between interview and MEPS processing: Injury, law violations, second guessing, etc. Creating the urgency to act, or a sense of urgency, gives the applicant a specific reason to complete the enlistment process now. The reason should site a situation that will alter or prevent the applicant from obtaining the job he/she wants, unless he/she enlists before the situation changes. Such situations might involve only one opening for a particular job and several interested applicants, the possibility of the required scores for the ASVAB going up, a shortage of training seats for BT, and endless others. The applicants won’t move unless you (the RRNCO) move them.

Leadership Lesson ADRP 6-22

 

PART ONE: THE BASIS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 1:  FUNDAMENTALS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 2:  ROLES AND LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP

 

PART TWO: THE ARMY LEADER: PERSON OF CHARACTER, PRESENCE, AND INTELLECT

CHAPTER 3: CHARACTER

CHAPTER 4:  Presence

CHAPTER 5:  INTELLECT

 

PART THREE:  COMPETENCY-BASED LEADERSHIP FOR DIRECT THROUGH STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 6:  LEADS Others

LEADS

BUILD TRUST

EXTEND INFLUENCE BEYOND THE CHAIN OF COMMAND

LEADS BY EXAMPLE

COMMUNICATES

CHAPTER 7:  DEVELOPS

CREATES A POSITIVE ENVIRONMENT/FOSTERS ESPRIT DE CORPS

SETTING THE CONDITIONS FOR POSITIVE CLIMATE

Fairness and Inclusiveness

Learning Environment

Assessing Climate

Dealing with Ethics and Climate

BUILDING COHESION AND TRUST

ENCOURAGING INITIATIVE

7-29. One of the greatest challenges for a leader is to encourage subordinates to exercise initiative. Soldiers and Army Civilians who are not in leadership positions are often reluctant to recognize that a situation calls for them to accept responsibility and step forward. This could involve speaking up when the Soldier has technical knowledge or situational information that the commander does not.

7-30. Climate largely determines the degree to which initiative and input is encouraged. Leaders can set the conditions for initiative by guiding others in thinking through problems for themselves. They can build confidence in the Soldier’s or Army Civilian’s competence and ability to solve problems.

7-31. Leaders who keep the well-being of their subordinates in mind create greater trust. Leaders who respect those with whom they work will likely garner respect in return. Simple actions can demonstrate respect and care, such as listening patiently or addressing Families’ needs. Regular sensing of morale and actively seeking honest feedback about the health of the organization indicate care.

CHAPTER 8:  ACHIEVES

CHAPTER 9:  LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE

PART FOUR:  LEADING AT ORGANIZATIONAL AND STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 10:  ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 11:  STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

 

King Solomon:  If the iron is blunt, and one does not sharpen the edge, he must use more strength, but wisdom helps one to succeed. (Ecclesiastes 10:10 ESV)

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Doug Siggins

MSG (r) Doug Siggins facilitates Training Tuesday Podcast to cultivate, collaborate and celebrate RRNCO success.
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