TRAINING TUESDAY PODCAST 218 (Selling You; Ethics and Climate; SSG Chris McKinney SDARNG D54 Achiever Interview)

 

Welcome to Tuesday Training Podcast…a conversation and collaboration between Army National Guard Recruiters where we can create a culture of excellence, collaborate creativity, and celebrate success.

 

This week, because of your efforts, lives will be changed, legacies will be started and generations will be impacted.  What you do matters…..you make a difference.

HOW MANY PEOPLE DID YOU ASK TO JOIN THE NATIONAL GUARD LAST WEEK?

 

TTMP

3 Segments this week:

 

  • 79T Tune Up
  • Leadership Lesson
  • Director 54 Achiever Interview

SOUTH DAKOTA D54 ACHIEVER SSG CHRIS McKINNEY  christopher.l.mckinney22.mil@mail.mil

79T Tune-Up  

NGPAM 601-1

Chapter 2 Recruiting Activities

Section I Product Knowledge

Section II Time Management

Section III Public Speaking

Section IV Market Analysis

Section V Pre-Qualification

Section VI Telephone Prospecting

Section VII Sales Psychology

2-47. General

  1. Another element of the interview the RRNCO must control is the environment in which the interview is conducted. If there are distractions present during the interview, it is difficult to hold the prospect’s attention.  Problems of this nature may be a television or radio playing in the background, younger children running in and out of the room, or some other source of noise or activity.  Eliminate the distraction in a polite manner, or move to a different location if possible, and the prospect’s attention will be focused on your message. You should, as much as possible, dictate the location of the interview, the time and who is in attendance. If in a prospect’s home, you (the RRNCO) should decide where to conduct business. Be polite and explain why you want to do what you are doing.  Be professional throughout the interview.
  2. Selling you. As a RRNCO, yours is a great success story that is worth telling. Before anybody is going to believe in a product you are trying to sell them, they need to believe in you. Are you honest? Are you an expert in your field? Have you been there yourself? Do you follow the Army values; are you looking out for my best interests? These are some of the questions that are on the minds of your prospects. Look like a Soldier, everybody respects that. You, as a RRNCO must the best at what you do. Be yourself. If you are a new, young RRNCO fresh out of the schoolhouse, don’t try to appear as the old war-horse veteran who has served for thirty years. It won’t work. Take advantage of whom and what you are. Make the applicant see you as a young, determined and obviously successful professional, on your way to the top. The few experiences you now have under your belt have been exciting ones, and you are expecting more excitement and challenge as you progress in your career. Nothing is going to stand in your way. Similarly, the old war-horse veteran should not try to act like a spry, young greenhorn who is making a start in the world. Even if you are new to recruiting and retention, you still have years of experience and wisdom to share with your prospects. Relate how the service has helped you develop into the energetic professional you are today, and how you are prepared for the day, if and when it comes, when you retire and continue your success on the civilian side of life.

 

Leadership Lesson ADRP 6-22

 

PART ONE: THE BASIS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 1:  FUNDAMENTALS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 2:  ROLES AND LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP

 

PART TWO: THE ARMY LEADER: PERSON OF CHARACTER, PRESENCE, AND INTELLECT

CHAPTER 3: CHARACTER

CHAPTER 4:  Presence

CHAPTER 5:  INTELLECT

 

PART THREE:  COMPETENCY-BASED LEADERSHIP FOR DIRECT THROUGH STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 6:  LEADS Others

LEADS

BUILD TRUST

EXTEND INFLUENCE BEYOND THE CHAIN OF COMMAND

LEADS BY EXAMPLE

COMMUNICATES

CHAPTER 7:  DEVELOPS

CREATES A POSITIVE ENVIRONMENT/FOSTERS ESPRIT DE CORPS

SETTING THE CONDITIONS FOR POSITIVE CLIMATE

Fairness and Inclusiveness

Learning Environment

Assessing Climate

Dealing with Ethics and Climate

7-23. A leader is the ethical standard-bearer for the organization, responsible for building an ethical climate that demands and rewards behavior consistent with the Army Values. Other staff specialists—the chaplain, staff judge advocate, inspector general, and equal employment opportunity specialist—help shape and assess the organization’s ethical climate. Regardless of available expert help, the ultimate responsibility to create and maintain an ethical climate rests with the leader.

7-24. Setting a good ethical example does not necessarily mean subordinates will follow it. Some may feel that circumstance justifies unethical behavior. Therefore, the leader must monitor the organization’s ethical climate and take prompt action to correct any discrepancies between the climate and the standard. To effectively monitor organizational climates, leaders can use the Ethical Climate Assessment Survey (see TC 1-05) combined with a focused leader plan of action as follows—

  • Begin the plan of action by assessing the unit. Observe those in the unit and gather feedback from them or conduct formal assessments of the workplace.
  • Analyze gathered information to identify what needs improvement. After identifying what needs improvement, begin developing courses of action to make the improvements.
  • Develop a plan of action. Develop and consider several possible courses of action to correct identified weaknesses. Gather important information, assess the limitations and risks associated with the various courses, identify available key personnel and resources, and verify facts and assumptions. Attempt to predict the outcome for each possible course of action. Based on predictions, select several leader actions to address target issues.
  • Execute the plan of action by educating, training, or counseling subordinates; instituting new policies or procedures; and revising or enforcing proper systems of rewards and punishment.  Periodically reassess the unit to identify new matters of concern or to evaluate the effectiveness of the leader actions.

7-25. Leaders use this process for many areas of interest within the organization. It is important for subordinates to have confidence in the organization’s ethical environment because much of what is necessary in combat goes against the grain of societal values that individuals bring into the Army. Strong commitment to the Army Values and Warrior Ethos by the commander fosters a unit’s ethical climate.

CHAPTER 8:  ACHIEVES

CHAPTER 9:  LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE

PART FOUR:  LEADING AT ORGANIZATIONAL AND STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 10:  ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 11:  STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

 

King Solomon:  If the iron is blunt, and one does not sharpen the edge, he must use more strength, but wisdom helps one to succeed. (Ecclesiastes 10:10 ESV)

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Doug Siggins

MSG (r) Doug Siggins facilitates Training Tuesday Podcast to cultivate, collaborate and celebrate RRNCO success.
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