TRAINING TUESDAY PODCAST 211 (D54 SSG Casey Waters IDARNG; Mission Moment; 79T Tune-Up; Leadership Lesson)

SSG Casey Waters

Welcome to Tuesday Training Podcast…a conversation and collaboration between Army National Guard Recruiters where we can create a culture of excellence, collaborate creativity, and celebrate success.


This week, because of your efforts, lives will be changed, legacies will be started and generations will be impacted.  What you do matters…..you make a difference.

HOW MANY PEOPLE DID YOU ASK TO JOIN THE NATIONAL GUARD LAST WEEK?

TTMP

4 Segments this week:

  • Mission Moment
  • Director 54 Achiever Interview
  • 79T Tune Up
  • Leadership Lesson

MISSION MOMENT with CSM (r) Dave Eustice of Military Recruiting Experts


Director 54 Achiever Interview

SSG Casey Waters IDARNG

208-789-5825  Casey.r.waters.mil@mail.mil


79T Tune-Up  

NGPAM 601-1

Chapter 2 Recruiting Activities

Section I Product Knowledge

Section II Time Management

Section III Public Speaking

Section IV Market Analysis

Section V Pre-Qualification

Section VI Telephone Prospecting

2-43. Calling

a. While you are telephone prospecting, the following are recommended to assist you in maintaining focus and goal oriented:

(1) Keep your calls short (3 to 5 minutes).

(2) Focus on obtaining an appointment.

(3) Pre-qualify prospects.

(4) Your message and the techniques must be natural.

(5) Be honest and maintain a positive, confident tone throughout the call.

(6) Avoid using tricks and slick techniques.

(7) Use techniques with which are comfortable.

(8) Give a minimum of sales information over the telephone (no phone interviews).

b. When attempting to sell over the phone vital information is lost and the interview may be terminated without gaining the appointment. Outbound communication is composed of different methods that allow for effective sales interview. Outbound communication is broke into three areas. They are words, tone of voice, and non-verbal. Each plays a part in the total understanding of the message trying to be conveyed as demonstrated below:

(1) 7% Words: This is the impact your message has on the receiver is attributable to the words you use. Even though words are an important part of communication, people only retain a small percentage.

(2) 38% Tone of Voice: Your tone, pitch, pace, rate, and volume make up this percentage. As mentioned previously in this chapter, it is important to get in a positive mind-set before making the telephone call.

(3) 55% Non-Verbal: This portion is attributable to your nonverbal signals such as your body language, facial expressions, and disposition. As noted in the high percentage, non-verbal communication is probably the most import component.

c. In order to achieve the maximum result of communicating the message of the ARNG, your goal should be to utilize 100% of the communication mediums available. If you try to sell the ARNG over the telephone, the most you can hope to achieve is 45%.

d. Stay in control of the conversation and don’t be tempted to sell the ARNG over the telephone. Stay focused on the objective that is to obtain an appointment. Don’t take any of the phone calls personal or be discouraged to make other calls. The more phone calls that you make the more you will become comfortable with the process.

Leadership Lesson ADRP 6-22


PART ONE: THE BASIS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 1:  FUNDAMENTALS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 2:  ROLES AND LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP


PART TWO: THE ARMY LEADER: PERSON OF CHARACTER, PRESENCE, AND INTELLECT

CHAPTER 3: CHARACTER

CHAPTER 4:  Presence

CHAPTER 5:  INTELLECT


PART THREE:  COMPETENCY-BASED LEADERSHIP FOR DIRECT THROUGH STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 6:  LEADS Others

LEADS

BUILD TRUST

EXTEND INFLUENCE BEYOND THE CHAIN OF COMMAND

LEADS BY EXAMPLE

COMMUNICATES

CHAPTER 7:  DEVELOPS

CREATES A POSITIVE ENVIRONMENT/FOSTERS ESPRIT DE CORPS

ESPRIT DE CORPS

7-8. Soldiers draw strength from knowing they are part of long-standing tradition. Many of the Army’s everyday customs and traditions remind Soldiers they are the latest addition to a long line of Soldiers. The uniforms, official ceremony music, salutes, military titles, the organization’s history, and the Army Values are reminders of tradition. This sense of belonging lives in many veterans long after they have left service.  For many, service to the nation remains the single most significant experience of their lives.

7-9. Soldiers join the Army to become part of something greater than themselves. The Army Values help deepen existing personal values, such as family bonds, work ethic, and integrity. Unit history is an important bonding factor since Soldiers want to belong to organizations with distinguished service records.  Unit names such as the Big Red One, All Americans, and Screaming Eagles carry an extensive history. To sustain tradition, leaders pass on the history that surrounds unit crests, awards, decorations, and badges. Upholding traditions ensures the Army’s culture becomes integral to every member of the Army team.


CHAPTER 8:  ACHIEVES

CHAPTER 9:  LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE


PART FOUR:  LEADING AT ORGANIZATIONAL AND STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 10:  ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 11:  STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP


King Solomon:  If the iron is blunt, and one does not sharpen the edge, he must use more strength, but wisdom helps one to succeed. (Ecclesiastes 10:10 ESV)

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Doug Siggins

MSG (r) Doug Siggins facilitates Training Tuesday Podcast to cultivate, collaborate and celebrate RRNCO success.
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