TRAINING TUESDAY PODCAST 180 (PRESENTATION TIPS; BUILDING TRUST OUTSIDE COC; CALL TO ACTION)

Welcome to Tuesday Training Podcast…a conversation and collaboration between Army National Guard Recruiters.  

This week, because of your efforts, lives will be changed, legacies will be started and generations will be impacted.  What you do matters…..you make a difference.

HOW MANY PEOPLE DID YOU ASK TO JOIN THE NATIONAL GUARD LAST WEEK?

Check on Learning:

  1. We discussed 10 tips for public speaking from the NG Pam 601-1 – what is one tip that you need to work on to improve your public speaking?
  2. In what way is Extending Influence Beyond Your Chain of Command an important competency for RRNCOs?
  3. From Chapter 7 of Building A Storybrand, what are the two types of plans to consider when thinking about making a successful plan for your applicant?

79T Tune-Up  

NGPAM 601-1

2-22. Presenting

You don’t have to be a professional presenter to deliver great presentations. If you’re familiar with the material and equipment and have rehearsed, you will do fine. Some people are naturally more comfortable speaking in front of others. With practice, everyone gets better. Here are some tips you can keep in mind both for effective delivery and for encouraging audience participation:

  1. Be positive: Probably the most important thing you can do is be positive. Punch up the actions leaders can take, not things they can’t control, and don’t emphasize negative behaviors.
  2. Sound natural: Speak as if you’re talking to a friend, not a group of strangers. Lesson plans will help you to do this if they are written in an informal manner.
  3. Pace yourself: Be sure that you go through the presentation in a measured way, neither too fast nor too slow.  Practice to ensure that you have no awkward pauses, halts, or place findings. You’ll need to time yourself to ensure that you stay within the allotted time frame. Remember, when you’re nervous you have a tendency to speed up, so take your time.
  4. Use simple words: The presentation should purposely use simple, clear words and an informal tone, techniques that have proven effective for improving understanding, and opening doors of communication. Note: If you change an existing presentation to fit your style, take care not to use big words when simple ones will do. Keep it clear, simple, conversational.
  5. Use excellent eye contact: Rehearse the presentation enough so that when you get into the classroom, you can simply glance down at the presentation to remember key points, then look up at the audience, make strong eye contact, and speak. Include the whole room and use 100% eye contact during the introduction and conclusion when you need to establish and solidify rapport. Take great care not to stare at your slides, your binder, or at a place in the back of the room beyond your audience. While maintaining excellent eye contact, check for understanding. If you see that someone “isn’t getting it” back up and re-state an idea. Use the three second rule when establishing eye contact, three seconds looking at an individual and then shift your eye contact to another audience member
  6. Maintain control of the presentation at all times: Be sure to keep leaders “on track.” Conversations can veer off the topic sometimes. It is your job to keep the leaders focused on the task at hand, and keep them solution oriented.
  7. Know your audience: Know who you are addressing. It is important to make sure that any examples you choose to use are relevant to audience members. And, know the strengths and weaknesses of your audience; you will be able to gear presentations to help solve their problems.
  8. Use open body language: Keep your body open and natural (no “fig leaf,” crossed arms, or “parade rest” stances). Move around the presentation area naturally, rather than remaining glued to one spot or pacing back and forth. Note: Present standing up unless the situation or space constraints require sitting down.
  9. Dress Appropriately: Wear the appropriate uniform, or proper civilian attire, depending on your audience and locale. For example, you might wear your Class Bs if you are giving a LEAD presentation at a conference; BDUs will be fine if you’re at a unit for a drill weekend. Whatever you wear, be neat, clean, and professional.
  10. Build rapport: Get leaders involved in the presentation by asking questions and encouraging discussion. If they aren’t participating, you may need to call on an encouraging, confident-looking individual to get the ball rolling. By keeping your tone informal, your voice natural, and your body language friendly, you will do much to encourage participants to talk to you and share their experiences.
  11. Generating feedback and discussion. One of the best ways to help your audience remember and understand the presentations is to get them involved. Throughout the LEAD presentations, there are opportunities for questions, discussions, and exercises located in the presenter’s notes. But getting audience participants involved in the discussion, depending on the class atmosphere, isn’t always easy. Here are a few tips to get around the blank stares:

(1) Share a personal experience: Participants will feel like you’ve confided in them if you use your personal experiences to show how you’ve tackled tough situations.

(2) Answer your own questions: If you are met with blank stares when you ask a question, toss out a few possible answers to get the ball rolling. By providing a few examples, you will get people to think along a similar line and encourage participation.

(3) Build rapport: You may be able to pinpoint participants who look like they have questions on their minds, but given the class, atmosphere don’t say anything. Pull them into the discussion by asking them what they think and encourage participation.

Leadership Lesson ADRP 6-22

PART ONE: THE BASIS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 1:  FUNDAMENTALS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 2:  ROLES AND LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP

PART TWO: THE ARMY LEADER: PERSON OF CHARACTER, PRESENCE, AND INTELLECT

CHAPTER 3: CHARACTER

CHAPTER 4:  PRESENCE

CHAPTER 5:  INTELLECT

PART THREE:  COMPETENCY-BASED LEADERSHIP FOR DIRECT THROUGH STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 6:  LEADS Others

LEADS

BUILD TRUST

EXTEND INFLUENCE BEYOND THE CHAIN OF COMMAND

BUILDING TRUST OUTSIDE LINES OF AUTHORITY

6-57. Forming effective, cohesive teams is often the first challenge of a leader working outside a traditional command structure. These teams usually form from disparate groups unfamiliar with military customs and culture. Successful teams develop an infectious winner’s attitude. Problems are challenges rather than obstacles. Cohesive teams accomplish missions more efficiently than a loose group of individuals. While developing seamless teams is ideal, sometimes it will not be practical to bring disparate groups together.

6-58. Building alliances is similar to building teams, the difference being that groups maintain greater independence in alliances. Trust is a common ingredient in effective alliances. Alliances evolve by establishing contact with others, growing friendships, and identifying common interests.

6-59. Whether operating in focused teams or loose alliances, training and working together builds collective competence and mutual trust. A mutual trust relationship ultimately permeates the entire organization, embracing every member, regardless of gender, race, social origin, religion, or duty status.

6-60. The requirements for building trust and cohesion are valid for relationships extending beyond the organization and the chain of command. They apply when working with task-organized organizations, unified action partners, and noncombatants. If a special operations team promises critical air support and medical supplies to indigenous multinational forces for an upcoming operation, the personal reputation of the leader and trust in the United States as a respected, supportive nation, can be at stake.

LEADS BY EXAMPLE

COMMUNICATES

CHAPTER 7:  DEVELOPS

CHAPTER 8:  ACHIEVES

CHAPTER 9:  LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE

PART FOUR:  LEADING AT ORGANIZATIONAL AND STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 10:  ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 11:  STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

CRAFT DEVELOPMENT

 

BUILDING A STORY BRAND; Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen, Donald Miller  http://buildingastorybrand.com/ Live Workshops

Buy the book – attend the workshop!

SB7 Framework

  1. A CHARACTER
  2. HAS A PROBLEM
  3. AND MEETS A GUIDE
  4. WHO GIVES THEM A PLAN
  5. AND CALLS THEM TO ACTION
  6. THAT HELPS THEM AVOID FAILURE
  7. THAT ENDS IN A SUCCESS

Chapter 8 – And Calls Them to Action

“…human beings do not make major life decisions unless something challenges them to do so.”  page 96

“Unless we are bold in our calls to action, we will be ignored.” page 96

“We think customers can read our minds.”  page 97

Two Kinds of Calls to Action

  1. Direct Call to Action
    1. Find Out More
    2. Schedule an appointment
    3. Register
    4. Request more information
  2. Transitional Calls to Action
    1. Inviting people to….
    2. A good call can
      1. Stake a claim to your territory
      2. Create reciprocity
      3. Position yourself as the guide
    3. Transitional Call
      1. Free Information:
        1. Create a PDF, a video series, or anything else that positions you as the expert
      2. Testimonials
      3. Samples
      4. Free Trial

Remember, people are drawn to clarity – connect the dots.

It is our job to pursue our customers.

Mystorybrand.com – brainstorm your plan

HOTLINE:  Leave voicemail to share ideas, celebrate success, solve a common problem, ask a question, correct an error  307-202-8031

King Solomon:  If the iron is blunt, and one does not sharpen the edge, he must use more strength, but wisdom helps one to succeed. (Ecclesiastes 10:10 ESV)

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Doug Siggins

MSG (r) Doug Siggins facilitates Training Tuesday Podcast to cultivate, collaborate and celebrate RRNCO success.
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