TRAINING TUESDAY PODCAST 181 (PRESENTATIONS PART 2; EXTEND INFLUENCE OUTSIDE CHAIN OF COMMAND; STORY BRAND – FAILURE)

Welcome to Tuesday Training Podcast…a conversation and collaboration between Army National Guard Recruiters.  

This week, because of your efforts, lives will be changed, legacies will be started and generations will be impacted.  What you do matters…..you make a difference.

HOW MANY PEOPLE DID YOU ASK TO JOIN THE NATIONAL GUARD LAST WEEK?

Check on Learning:

  1. To be a professional presenter eye contact is very important.  The NG Pam 601-1 reminds us that we should have 100% eye contact during which parts of a presentation.
  2. Every marketing conversation must have a call to action.  What are 3 transitional calls of action you can incorporate into your social media campaigns?

 

79T Tune-Up  

NGPAM 601-1

2-22. Presenting

You don’t have to be a professional presenter to deliver great presentations. If you’re familiar with the material and equipment and have rehearsed, you will do fine. Some people are naturally more comfortable speaking in front of others. With practice, everyone gets better. Here are some tips you can keep in mind both for effective delivery and for encouraging audience participation:

  1. Maintain control of the presentation at all times: Be sure to keep leaders “on track.” Conversations can veer off the topic sometimes. It is your job to keep the leaders focused on the task at hand, and keep them solution oriented.
  2. Know your audience: Know who you are addressing. It is important to make sure that any examples you choose to use are relevant to audience members. And, know the strengths and weaknesses of your audience; you will be able to gear presentations to help solve their problems.
  3. Use open body language: Keep your body open and natural (no “fig leaf,” crossed arms, or “parade rest” stances). Move around the presentation area naturally, rather than remaining glued to one spot or pacing back and forth. Note: Present standing up unless the situation or space constraints require sitting down.
  4. Dress Appropriately: Wear the appropriate uniform, or proper civilian attire, depending on your audience and locale. For example, you might wear your Class Bs if you are giving a LEAD presentation at a conference; BDUs will be fine if you’re at a unit for a drill weekend. Whatever you wear, be neat, clean, and professional.
  5. Build rapport: Get leaders involved in the presentation by asking questions and encouraging discussion. If they aren’t participating, you may need to call on an encouraging, confident-looking individual to get the ball rolling. By keeping your tone informal, your voice natural, and your body language friendly, you will do much to encourage participants to talk to you and share their experiences.
  6. Generating feedback and discussion. One of the best ways to help your audience remember and understand the presentations is to get them involved. Throughout the LEAD presentations, there are opportunities for questions, discussions, and exercises located in the presenter’s notes. But getting audience participants involved in the discussion, depending on the class atmosphere, isn’t always easy. Here are a few tips to get around the blank stares:

(1) Share a personal experience: Participants will feel like you’ve confided in them if you use your personal experiences to show how you’ve tackled tough situations.

(2) Answer your own questions: If you are met with blank stares when you ask a question, toss out a few possible answers to get the ball rolling. By providing a few examples, you will get people to think along a similar line and encourage participation.

(3) Build rapport: You may be able to pinpoint participants who look like they have questions on their minds, but given the class, atmosphere don’t say anything. Pull them into the discussion by asking them what they think and encourage participation.

Leadership Lesson ADRP 6-22

PART ONE: THE BASIS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 1:  FUNDAMENTALS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 2:  ROLES AND LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP

PART TWO: THE ARMY LEADER: PERSON OF CHARACTER, PRESENCE, AND INTELLECT

CHAPTER 3: CHARACTER

CHAPTER 4:  PRESENCE

CHAPTER 5:  INTELLECT

PART THREE:  COMPETENCY-BASED LEADERSHIP FOR DIRECT THROUGH STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 6:  LEADS Others

LEADS

BUILD TRUST

EXTEND INFLUENCE BEYOND THE CHAIN OF COMMAND

UNDERSTANDING SPHERE, MEANS, AND LIMITS OF INFLUENCE

6-61. When operating within an established command structure and common procedures, the provisions and limits of roles and responsibilities are readily apparent. When leading outside an established organization, assessing the parties involved becomes another part of the operation. Identifying who is who, what role they have, over whom they have authority or influence, and how they are likely to respond to the Army leader’s influence are important considerations. Sometimes this is viewed as understanding the limits to the Army’s or the leader’s influence.

6-62. Spanning the boundaries of disparate groups or organizations requires special attention. The key to extending influence outside the chain of command is learning about those organizations. By understanding their interests and desires, the leader will know what methods of influence are most likely to work.

6-63. Effective operations require commanders to establish information themes and integrate them with actions to achieve a desired end state. Information, as an element of combat power, is a critical and sometimes decisive factor in operations. Effectively employed, it shapes the operational environment and multiplies the effects of friendly successes while countering adversary or enemy information efforts.

LEADS BY EXAMPLE

COMMUNICATES

CHAPTER 7:  DEVELOPS

CHAPTER 8:  ACHIEVES

CHAPTER 9:  LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE

PART FOUR:  LEADING AT ORGANIZATIONAL AND STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 10:  ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 11:  STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

 

CRAFT DEVELOPMENT

BUILDING A STORY BRAND; Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen, Donald Miller  http://buildingastorybrand.com/ Live Workshops

Buy the book – attend the workshop!

SB7 Framework

  1. A CHARACTER
  2. HAS A PROBLEM
  3. AND MEETS A GUIDE
  4. WHO GIVES THEM A PLAN
  5. AND CALLS THEM TO ACTION
  6. THAT HELPS THEM AVOID FAILURE
  7. THAT ENDS IN A SUCCESS

Chapter 9 – That Helps Them Avoid Failure.

The story lives and dies on the question:  will the hero succeed or will they fail? Pg 107

Motives:  escape something bad or experience something good.

What’s at stake for the hero?

What’s there to lose?

Don’t want to be a fearmonger, but most people don’t bring up the negative stakes enough so the story really falls flat.

No stake…no story.

Prospect Theory (Daniel Kahneman) – people are more likely to be dissatisfied with a loss than they are satisfied with again. – hate losing $100 more than gaining $100

Building Communication Theory

  1. Know they are vulnerable
  2. Take action to reduce vulnerability
  3. Know there is an action to protect
  4. Challange people to take action

Just a pinch of salt

(Example) Rely Technology (audio and video for the home)

  • Living in a boring home
  • Nobody will want to watch the game at your house
  • You need a PhD to turn on the TV

Army National Guard

  • Stranded in a dead end job
  • Just another thing you did not do
  • Watch others care for your neighbors
  • Stifled tomorrow because of choices today

Mystorybrand.com – brainstorm your plan

HOTLINE:  Leave voicemail to share ideas, celebrate success, solve a common problem, ask a question, correct an error  307-202-8031

King Solomon:  If the iron is blunt, and one does not sharpen the edge, he must use more strength, but wisdom helps one to succeed. (Ecclesiastes 10:10 ESV)

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Doug Siggins

MSG (r) Doug Siggins facilitates Training Tuesday Podcast to cultivate, collaborate and celebrate RRNCO success.
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