TRAINING TUESDAY PODCAST 173 (PRESENTATION; HIGH-RISK BEHAVIOR; 7 POINT STORY)

Reduce new-hire production delays, resource Performance-Improvement-Plans, and promote collaboration to increase ARNG enlistments by providing weekly audio sustainment training and an online training archive to retain our institutional knowledge.

THIS WEEK:  

Welcome to Tuesday Training Podcast…a conversation and collaboration between Army National Guard Recruiters.  

This week, because of your efforts, lives will be changed, legacies will be started and generations will be impacted.  What you do matters…..you make a difference.

HOW MANY PEOPLE DID YOU ASK TO JOIN THE NATIONAL GUARD LAST WEEK?

Check On Learning from Last Week:

  1. What does the acronym SPAM stand for in relation to presentations?
  2. How does excellence enhance welfare?
  3. Don Miller in Story Branding says, “If you confuse, you ______!”

79T Tune-Up  

NGPAM 601-1

2-17. The Three Parts of a Presentation

  1. Opening: The opening of your presentation accomplishes a few things. First, it introduces you as the presenter and allows the audience to form their first impression of you, so make it a good one. Make sure you introduce yourself briefly and let the audience know whom you represent. Secondly, the opening sets the agenda for what is going to be covered in your presentation, stresses the importance of your topic and lets the audience know what they can expect to gain from the presentation. Third and last, it lets the audience know approximately how long your presentation will take. An example of an opening may be: “Good Morning. I’m Sergeant First Class Rock with the Oklahoma Army National Guard and it’s my pleasure to be in your class today. This morning I will spend two hours with you furnishing information about benefits that will help you in pursuit of your education and career choices. If you need help to attain a college degree or skills that will help you pursue your chosen vocation, the Oklahoma Army National Guard can assist you.”
  2. Body: The body of your presentation contains the information you are trying to convey to the audience. If your subject is wide-ranging or encompassing, break it down into manageable chunks. Use the “Rule of Three” when preparing the body of your presentation. Have each topic or sub-topic broken into three sub-points or segments. This makes delivery easier, allows for a quick, occasional review, and allows the audience to absorb more. For instance, a presentation on how to obtain money for college may include in the body the following three sub-sections:
    1. How much does college cost?
    2. What are your funding options to meet the cost?
    3. How is funding obtaining?
  3. Conclusion: During the conclusion of your presentation, you review or summarize what’s been covered and thank the audience for their time. Don’t let the summary turn into a re-presentation. Highlight the major points of your presentation and leave your audience with something to remember you by. The last part of the conclusion would be to ask for any questions.

Leadership Lesson ADRP 6-22

PART ONE: THE BASIS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 1:  FUNDAMENTALS OF LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 2:  ROLES AND LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP

 

PART TWO: THE ARMY LEADER: PERSON OF CHARACTER, PRESENCE, AND INTELLECT

CHAPTER 3: CHARACTER

CHAPTER 4:  PRESENCE

CHAPTER 5:  INTELLECT

 

PART THREE:  COMPETENCY-BASED LEADERSHIP FOR DIRECT THROUGH STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 6:  LEADS

Identifying High Risk Behavior

6-45. Leaders identify subordinates who exhibit high-risk behavior. High-risk behavior is a behavioral pattern that intentionally or unintentionally increases the individual’s probability of negative consequences.  Examples of high-risk behavior include driving under the influence, failing to wear proper protective equipment, criminal activity, illegal use of drugs, and other dangerous activities. Data suggests there is a link between these behaviors and suicides as well as accidental deaths. Studies suggest there is a direct link to increased life stressors and increased risk behavior. High-risk behaviors can ruin careers.

6-46. The Army regulates good order and discipline through enforcement of statutes (e.g., the Uniform Code of Military Justice) and policy. Misconduct represents a conscious decision to accept both the risk associated with a prohibited activity (such as riding a motorcycle without a helmet) and the risk of being caught while violating the standard (the Army’s helmet policy). Leaders identify Soldiers as high-risk when they violate standards.

6-47. A commander’s primary responsibility for unit sustainment is to ensure the readiness, health, morale, welfare, and discipline of the unit. Every leader has a role in supporting that responsibility. Leaders must identify at-risk Soldiers, mitigate their stress, and intervene to help them.

CHAPTER 7:  DEVELOPS

CHAPTER 8:  ACHIEVES

CHAPTER 9:  LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE

PART FOUR:  LEADING AT ORGANIZATIONAL AND STRATEGIC LEVELS

CHAPTER 10:  ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

CHAPTER 11:  STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

 

CRAFT DEVELOPMENT

BUILDING A STORY BRAND; Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen, Donald Miller  http://buildingastorybrand.com/

Chapter 2 and 3

“Stories make music out of noise.” pg 16

“When story tellers bombard people with too much information, the audience is forced to burn too many calories organizing the data.”  pg 17

Apple – Think Different

“Here is nearly every story you see or hear in a nutshell:  A CHARACTER who wants something encounters a PROBLEM before they can get it.  At the peak fo their despair, a GUIDE steps into their lives, gives them a PLAN, and CALLS THEM TO ACTION.  The action helps them avoid FAILURE and ends in a SUCCESS.” pg 20

The Three Crucial Questions

  1. What does the hero want?
  2. Who or what is opposing the hero getting what she wants?
  3. What will the hero’s life look like if she does (or doesn’t) get what she wants?

“Alfred Hitchcock defined a good story as ‘life with the dull parts daken out.’” pg 26

  1. A character:  The customer is the hero, not your brand
    1. Luke Skywalker
    2. Your applicant
    3. Your school
    4. Your parents
  2. Has a Problem: Companies tend to sell solutions to external problems, but customers buy solutions to internal problems.
    1. External, Internal and Philosophical problems
  3. And Meets a Guide: Customers aren’t looking for another hero, they’re looking for a guide.
    1. Yoda
    2. Heroes don’t solve their own problems
    3. “Nearly every human being is looking for a guide (or guides) to help them win the day.” pg 32
  4. Who Gives Them a Plan: Customers trust a Guide who has a plan
  5. And Calls Them to Action:  Customers do not take action unless they are challenged to take action.
  6. That Helps Them Avoid Failure:  Every human being is trying to avoid a tragic ending
  7. And Ends in Success:  Never assume people understand how your brand can change their lives.  Tell Them

Mystorybrand.com

 

HOTLINE:  Leave voicemail to share ideas, celebrate success, solve a common problem, ask a question, correct an error  307-202-8031

King Solomon:  If the iron is blunt, and one does not sharpen the edge, he must use more strength, but wisdom helps one to succeed. (Ecclesiastes 10:10 ESV)

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Doug Siggins

MSG (r) Doug Siggins facilitates Training Tuesday Podcast to cultivate, collaborate and celebrate RRNCO success.
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